Artist

> Apnavi Makanji

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Exhibitions

Appropriation Disinformation- Nature and the Body Politic

10 September 2020

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Resurgence

21 April 2020

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Soil as witness | Memory as wound

14 March 2019

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Press

  • Memory meets metamorphosis

    Apnavi Makanji dabbles with nature and the olfactory senses to explore the circle of life.

    The Hindu
    30 Mar 2019
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  • Geneva Business News-APNAVI MAKANJI: THE INVISIBLE AT FIRST SIGHT

    Through drawing, installation and video, Apnavi Makanji explores a series of questions relating to ecology and the Anthropocene. To issues related to environmental justice, biopolitics and geopolitics, iel * exposes his research on memory and “at home”. The artist takes a critical look at our interaction with nature in urban spaces. The universe of the Geneva artist, Apnavi Makanji , is a poetic immersion in a matrix revealing the infinitesimal, with a language that is at once fantastic, delicate and poignant. Their works, as a tribute to nature, reflect their fascination for microsystems.

    Geneva Business News
    15 Apr 2020
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  • Mid-day – Hop around art

    TARQ Apnavi Makanji's work has made its way to India for the first time. About the significance of Appropriation Disinforma­tion - Nature and the Body Politic, gallerist Hena Kapadia says, "The works consist of collages on pages from a 70-year-old encyclopaedia - the background of each work lists regions exploited by colonis­ers over the years for their various metals and minerals."

    Mid-day
    10 Sep 2020
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  • The Indian Express – Galleries in Mumbai reopen with new shows & safety guidelines

    Gallery TARQ reopens with a suite of collages by Apnavi Makanji, a Geneva-based artist known to explore ideas of ecology, home and memory. Tarq’s owner, Hena Kapadia, said her space is prioritising the safety of visitors by asking them to fill out an online form with contact details for an appointment. Visiting slots are scheduled at 15-minute intervals to ensure distancing. Kapadia said, “My team and I are genuinely excited to meet people we haven’t been able to see in so long.” While her gallery has had virtual exhibitions and events during lockdown, seeing an artwork in a physical setting is qualitatively different, she added.

    The Indian Express
    10 Sep 2020
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  • Live Mint- The art season is here and raring to go

    Geneva-based artist Apnavi Makanji’s drawings and installations have always added a layer of meaning to archival material, creating complex constructs informed by botany, memory and displacement. In their new series, Makanji has taken archival material from a French atlas, Atlas International Larousse Politique Et Economique, dating back to the 1950s, and layered it with collages of fictitious dead and decaying monsters made with found pages of a magazine. “By taking this atlas, she has looked at tools of capitalism and proof of systematic violence. The atlas also lists the materials that came from the colonies. Hence the work examines the injustice of resource distribution," says gallerist Hena Kapadia, who is showing these works as part of the show Appropriation Disinformation—Nature And The Body Politic, at Tarq, Mumbai. These collages were shown earlier this year at the Dhaka Art Summit as part of the exhibition Seismic Movements, curated by Diana Campbell.

    Mint Lounge
    11 Sep 2020
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  • Mumbai Mirror- Unwind: 3 things to do today

    Geneva-based artist Apnavi Makanji’s Appropriation Disinformation - Nature and the Body Politic is currently on display at TARQ in Colaba, for the first time in India.It was initially exhibited at the Dhaka Art Summit earlier this year.

    Mumbai Mirror
    19 Sep 2020
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  • AD- Mumbai: Apnavi Makanji’s collages use ecology to show how imperialism has impacted our economic present

    When artist Apnavi Makanji showcased her collages at the Dhaka Art Summit earlier this year, it sparked many interesting conversations with the viewers. In the exhibition Seismic Movements, curated by Diana Campbell, Makanji’s work sought to highlight how imperialism has defined our geopolitical and economic present, through the filter of ecology. These works titled Appropriation Disinformation—Nature and the Body Politic are on display for the first time in India at Tarq, Mumbai till the end of this month.

    AD Magazine
    22 Sep 2020
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  • Design Pataki- Four Must-Visit Art Shows This Month

    An engaging show that revisits history, ‘Appropriation Disinformation- Nature and the Body Politic’ was initially exhibited at the Dhaka Art Summit, titled ‘Seismic Movements.’ This month it will be showcased for the first time in India at TARQ, Mumbai. Makanji’s collages serve as a commentary on a myriad of issues associated with globalisation and free trade like the climate emergency, the displacement of indigenous communities and lands that existed before colonisation and ‘extractivism’ which refers to the extraction of minerals to sell on the global market. 

    Design Pataki
    29 Sep 2020
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  • Art Fervour- Of Virtual Exhibitions in Four Indian Galleries

    The final view from the room would be an open call to judging information that could be just, and yet, treacherous to the eye. An occupant of TARQ’s viewing room was artist Apnavi Makanji’s “Appropriation Disinformation - Nature and the Body Politic”. It turned to a different stretch of a map to elaborate on the collision and spirit of nature and the body politic. With maps from Atlas International Larousse Politique et Economique (1950), Makanji’s collection of treasures was also a glimpse into how this stop could be anywhere on the map and you could visit it just the same.

    Art Fervour
    17 Oct 2020
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