Exhibitions

> Reliquaries -The Remembered Self

Suruchi Choksi 

, Rithika Merchant

12 March - 10 April, 2015


An exhibition of recent works by Suruchi Choksi and Rithika Merchant, “RELIQUARIES” takes a closer look at how we construct and envision our pasts, both collective and personal. Through their respective processes both artists are able to uniquely capture two aspects of recollecting that are radically different, yet inextricably linked to each other.

In Suruchi’s photographs, printed on aluminum, as well as in her six-channel video installation, she toys with the idea of photographs being a conductor in the orchestration of our own personal memory. Her distressed and distorted personal photographs tell a story that has evolved over time, both physically and emotionally. She delves into each layer of the image, assuming that no picture, and no story, is absolute at any given time, for it is seen through filters that every individual carries in their mind’s eyes.

Rithika’s characters hark back to a sense of belief in ritual, with each intricate watercolour building a mystical narrative from one image to the next. An inherent feminism exists in her decoration undermining the minimalism of modernity that views a woman just as a muse. Her use of cut out; almost puzzle-like pieces effortlessly permits us to piece together a narrative, using some of our own magical thinking.

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Artists

Suruchi Choksi 

is a self-taught artist. Having grown up in Kolkata and working presently out of Mumbai, her works grapples with the issues of space, limits, absence and elsewhere. Her work is abstract, and by contesting the division between the realms of memory and the realm of experience she makes works that are intensely personal.

Rithika Merchant


Rithika Merchant (b. 1986) received her Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Arts from Parsons - The New School of Design, New York (2008). Since graduating, she has exhibited her work extensively, including a number of solo exhibitions in India, Spain, Germany, France and the United States.

Her most recent solo shows include Where the Water Takes us at TARQ, Mumbai (2017); Ancestral Home at Galeria Bien Cuadrado, Barcelona (2017); Intersections at Galeria Combustion Espontanea, Madrid (2016); Luna Tabulatorum at Stephen Romano Gallery, New York (2015); and Encyclopedia of the Strange at Tiny Griffon Gallery, Nuremberg (2014).

Her recent group exhibitions include Spring! A Group Show of Contemporary Drawing at Galerie LJ, Paris (2019); Homo Faber at The Michaelangelo Foundation, Venice ( 2018) ; Portal at October Gallery, London (2018); Sensorium / The End Is Only The Beginning Sunaparanta, Goa Centre for the Arts, Goa (2018); This Burning Land Belongs To You at the Swiss Cottage Gallery, London (presented by TARQ for Camden Kala, UK/ India Year of Culture 2017); Language of the Birds: Occult and Art at 80WSE Gallery, New York (2016); and a two-person show, Reliquaries: The Remembered Self at TARQ, Mumbai (2015). Her work has also been included in group shows at The New Gallery, Calgary (2017); Summerhall, Edinburgh (2015) and The Morbid Anatomy Museum, New York (2015).

She has also collaborated with Chloé, a French fashion house on multiple collections for which she was awarded the Vogue India Young Achiever of the Year Award at its Women of the Year Awards 2018. She was also named one of Vogue Magazine’s Vogue World 100 Creative Voices.

She currently divides her time between Mumbai and Barcelona.

Press

  • The Memory Crucible

    Tarq gallery, Mumbai presents a two person show titled, ‘Reliquaries – The Remembered Self’ of works by artists Rithika Merchant and Suruchi Choksi. One could view this show as a photo album of a distant past which evades definitions and a present which we witness as constantly turning into a past.

    Artehelka
    09 Apr 2015
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  • Remember the Time

    In a reproduced photograph by Suruchi Choksi, a ghost of a figure is seen leaning against a lamp post. A possible famous landmark forms the background, but it is too blurry to recognise.

    The Indian Express
    25 Mar 2015
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