Artist

> Nibha Sikander

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Exhibitions

Resurgence

21 April 2020

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Wandering Violin Mantis

29 November 2019

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Press

  • Paper, Threads, Dolls- ART India

    Sandhya Bordewekar discusses the works of five Baroda artists who engage with diverse crafts- based methods in their art practices. One has to see Nibha's delicately crafted and minutely worked paper relief sculptures of moths and birds with a magnifying glass to catch the intricate nuances. Nibha started paper-cutting before she joined an art school and developed her own techniques that depended largely on the thickness of papers.  

    Art India
    12 Dec 2019
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  • Live Mint- Imagining the ‘Anthropo-scene’

    Nearly 500km away, in Murud-Janjira, in Maharashtra’s Raigad district, Nibha Sikander too has been engaging with her immediate environment—albeit in a slightly different way. Since 2012, she has been creating portraits of the moths, mantises and birds that she encounters regularly at her home—built by her grandfather 40 years ago—in the coastal town of Janjira. Her fascination with birds started in 2012 when she chanced upon the Great Indian Hornbill at the Nameri National Park in Assam. “I was mesmerized by its scale and the way it moved," she reminisces. Soon, Sikander started referring to books to find similar forms. Around four years ago, she started spending more time away from Mumbai at the house in Janjira, where she would come across Paradise-flycatchers in winter and moths in the monsoon.

    Mint
    01 Feb 2020
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  • The Art of Documenting- Mid-day

    Wandering Violin Mantis: During a visit with family to the Kaziranga National Park in 2012, Nibha Sikander was blown away at the sight of the Great Indian Hornbill. Birds, have always been fodder for conversation with the artist's family, and their home in Murud-Janjira has only aided this. But, seven year ago, Sikander began translating it into art with intricate paper cut-outs and layering that takes the shape of insects, moths and birds. Having built a collection of over 400 such three-dimensional figures, she presents them at her first solo, Wandering Violin Mantis. "Eight months ago, I found one on the bench. It was so beautifully camouflaged as a twig that I ended up observing it for three hours," she says. With tools comprising an x-acto knife and coloured card paper, Sikander's technique has evolved over time. She says, "When I started cutting, my works were flatter. Then, I began layering them to look like sculptural relief. The time taken to complete each piece varies: from two days to 14 for birds." - Nibha Sikander

    Mid-day
    02 Dec 2019
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  • Art Around Town | Mumbai Mirror

    Artist Nibha Sikander’s first solo exhibition, Wandering Violin Mantis, is inspired by her fascination with nature and her creatures, which she developed during her childhood. She uses layers of intricately cut out paper to create moths, mantises and birds- some inspired by real and imagined creatures. Nov 29 to Jan 4, 11 am to 6:30 pm. Tarq, Colaba. Call: 66150424

    Mumbai Mirror
    19 Nov 2019
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  • Pool Design. A Natural Instinct

    Nibha Sikander's 3D figures of birds and insects are intended to draw attention to the wonders of nature. She tells Sonalee Tamar of 'The Indian Curator' how she was drawn to the art of paper-cutting. I started cutting paper over 15 years ago and when I first started, it literally involved taking a single piece of paper and cutting it into abstract forms. This developed into more stencil-like forms using colored paper. Almost six or seven years ago, I developed ..this technique of laying paper from the top and adding thicker paper in-between, to add more body and make it more relief sculpture like.

    POOL Design Magazine
    11 Feb 2020
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  • Domus. Notes on Nature and Art.

    In a recently concluded exhibition, artist Nibha Sikander creates stunningly lifelike creatures- birds, insects and moths- all handmade from paper. It is her preternatural rendering of the natural in all of its gorgeous details that summons forth, in the viewer, a wave of rapture.

    Domus
    03 Mar 2020
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  • Sunday Mid-Day: Where to Draw the Line

    India's Artists On What They Are Making During The Lockdown

    India's established and young artists find themselves turning to their art to make sense of the sorrow around them and renew their promise to co-exist with nature.

    Sunday Mid-Day
    12 Apr 2020
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